RSS .92| RSS 2.0| ATOM 0.3
  • Home
  • About
  •  

    Paste Plain Text into Microsoft Word

    November 13th, 2008

    Do you copy text from one document or web-page and then paste it into Microsoft Word?

    Do you want the formatting to be the same as the rest of your Word document, or the same format as the document you copied?

    Most of the time, I prefer the pasted text to be in the format of the current document.  If I need to alter the text, indent, bullet, etc…I can do that later.

    It is rather easy to Paste Special/Unformatted Text in Word.

    1. From either the Edit menu or the Home Ribbon, choose Paste Special
    2. Choose Unformatted Text from the dialog box
    3. Click OK.

    For those of us who prefer to use Ctrl-V when we paste, that choice is not available.

    I read a tip many years ago about changing the function of the Ctrl-V shortcut keys to execute Paste Unformatted Text.

    In simple terms, you create a macro and assign it to Ctrl-V.  Downside, if you want to paste including formatting, or another type of Paste Special, you will have to use the menu.

    For Word 2007

    1. Open a blank document
    2. Navigate to the Developer Tab in the ribbon (did I tell you I cannot get used to the ribbon?) – If you do not have the Developer Tab on your ribbon, go to the bottom of this post for a tip.
    3. Click the Record Macro button
    4. Name your Macro, “PasteUnformatted” is a good one
    5. Click the Keyboard button
    6. Press Ctrl-V on your keyboard
    7. Click the Assign button
    8. Click the Close button
    9. The Macro Recorder is running, but since Word 2007 does not seem to record this macro correctly, click on the Stop Recording button
    10. Click on the Macros button
    11. Choose “PasteUnformatted” from the list and click on the Edit button
    12. You will see the code for any macros in this document.  Find the PasteUnformatted code.  It should look like this:

      Sub PasteUnformatted()


      ‘ PasteUnformatted Macro

      End Sub

    13. Add the line:
      Selection.PasteSpecial DataType:=wdPasteText
      so that it looks like this:

      Sub PasteUnformatted()

      ‘ PasteUnformatted Macro


      Selection.PasteSpecial DataType:=wdPasteText
      End Sub

    14. Close the editor, it will save automatically
    15. Test out your new keystrokes.
    16. Copy some text from a web-page
    17. Navigate to Word 2007
    18. Paste using the Ctrl-V keys then try using the button in the ribbon.
    19. They should be different, unless the web-page was formatted exactly like your Word document.


    For Word 2003 – the process is very similar

    1. Open a blank document
    2. Choose Tools/Macro/Record New Macro from the menu.
      Name your Macro, “PasteUnformatted” is a good one
    3. Click the Keyboard button
    4. Press Ctrl-V on your keyboard
    5. Click the Assign button
    6. Click the Close button
    7. The Macro Recorder is running, but since Word 2003 does not seem to record this macro correctly, click on the Stop Recording button or choose Tools/Macro/Stop Recording from the menu
    8. Choose Tools/Macro/Macros from the menu
    9. Choose “PasteUnformatted” from the list and click on the Edit button
    10. You will see the code for any macros in this document.  Find the PasteUnformatted code.  It should look like this:

      Sub PasteUnformatted()

      ‘ PasteUnformatted Macro


      End Sub

    11. Add the line:
      Selection.PasteSpecial DataType:=wdPasteText
      so that it looks like this:

      Sub PasteUnformatted()

      ‘ PasteUnformatted Macro


      Selection.PasteSpecial DataType:=wdPasteText
      End Sub

    12. Close the editor, it will save automatically
    13. Test out your new keystrokes.
    14. Copy some text from a web-page
    15. Navigate to Word 2003
    16. Paste using the Ctrl-V keys then try using the button in the ribbon.
    17. They should be different, unless the web-page was formatted exactly like your Word document.

    That is all there is to it.  It is quite a few steps, but in about 5 minutes you can save yourself lots of time later.  Let me know how it works for you!

    ———-

    How-To-Show-The-Developer-Tab-In-Word-2007

    1. Click on the Office Button
    2. Click on the Word Options button
    3. Choose Popular
    4. There should be a check box next to “Show Developer Tab in the Ribbon” — Check that box.
    5. Click OK
    6. The Developer tab should be in your Ribbon now.



    Remote control of PCs

    November 10th, 2008

    Have you ever wished you could see your client’s PC from your own office? Or wanted to help a family member figure out how to make some edits to an Excel spreadsheet?

    There are several tools that you can use to control another PC remotely. I have used these three:

    VNC tends to be faster than all the rest, but is much more technical and complicated to set up and run. It works great, I recommend UltraVNC as my VNC choice.

    PCAnywhere was used by one of my former employers. It worked well, was fairly easy to use, and fit into our corporate network. It did require the client to provide the help desk with the IP address of the PC we were going to control. That could sometimes be difficult. You could have multiple sessions open to help multiple users at the same time. Additionally, the licenses are not cheap for occasional usage.

    I use LogMeIn to help family and friends with their PCs. Once the client software is installed on the remote PC, very little maintenance is required. The remote user can disable the software if they would prefer not allowing remote access without their permission or authorization. Additionally, there are settings to require permission from the remote user to access the PC.

    LogMeIn has several premium versions that have a subscription fee associated with them. I have used the free version for several years with great success.

    Pros:

    • Free
    • Works with firewalls that I have used. (Norton, Kerio, SPF)
    • Only requires browser for the local PC
    • No IP address information needs to be relayed.
    • Several security options are available.

    Cons:

    • Enable/Disable feature on remote PC is not perfect.
    • Requires account password to install remote client (might want to change it to something you can share while installing it, then changing it to something more secure for yourself)
    • Data travels through LogMeIn’s servers, it is not point-to-point.
    • File transfer is not available on the free version.

    I suggest that you try out LogMeIn and judge for yourself.

    A couple of things to remember:

    1. If you are installing on a “remote” PC that you will not be sitting in front of while it the client software is installed, you will have to provide the person working on that PC your LogMeIn user id and password to start the installation.


    2. Depending on the configuration of the remote PC, you will need to set up an access code. If the PC is setup for users with passwords, those end up being the access codes. Therefore, the remote PC might need to have an additional user id added to it for you to use to access it. This will depend on the security setup on the remote PC and your relationship with the PC’s owner. For example, since I maintain and support my parent’s PC, I have the user id’s and passwords for their PC’s. They don’t have an issue with that. In the case of friends, I have had them set up a user id for me that they can disable later.

    Let me know how LogMeIn works for you. I’m a satisfied, free, customer.


    Social Bookmarking

    November 2nd, 2008

    I have used social bookmarking primarily to keep track of places on the web that I want to visit later or keep track of.

    The option to share those links with other people is good, as long as you remain fairly organized.  Just bookmarking for bookmarking sake is will not be helpful for other people.

    The ability to search the bookmarks for keywords and find things you want to share with others is cool too.

    While Delicious is a favorite of many, I have been using Furl.net for several years.

    Bookmarks and favorites are a great way to store and access frequently used locations on the Internet. Furl is designed to archive (as well as share) anything you read online. You may have tens of bookmarks but thousands of Furl entries. If you read your local newspaper online every morning, bookmark it. If you read several fascinating news articles every week, Furl them. You can Furl items from work and home. You can search for them later from any browser, and share them with friends.

    My Furl page is at http://www.furl.net/member/weglarz

    Furl allows me to bookmark pages and share what I would like to share and keep private bookmarks I would like to keep private.

    Try it out.  Add some topics, comments, clip a section, and add keywords.

    Let me know how it works for you.